Archive for Russell Wilson

A Dream Deferred!

Posted in On Sports! with tags , , , on February 4, 2015 by playthell

Russell Wilson

The Little Big Man Leaves the Field: Beaten but Unbowed

 Reflections on the Super Bowl 2015

“I knew what was going to happen,” “I don’t know how I knew. I just knew. I just beat him to the point and caught the ball.” Says Malcolm Butler.

It was one of the most exciting Super Bowls I have witnessed….and I’ve seen them all.  It was a close game with grand competition and many great plays.  But because sports is what it is, a test of our physical and mental abilities on a level playing field where hard work and talent can’t be denied even by people who set up arbitrary standards for excellence, you can never predict with certainty how a game will end – who will emerge the victor or the vanquished. This is because sport has objective standards for performance and the competition to meet or exceed those standards are held in a public arena where anyone willing to pay the price of the ticket can witness it,  thus preventing foul play by corrupt cabals in back rooms who seek to fix outcomes.   In such an arena, where the pressure to win is unrelenting, greatness can arise from anywhere on the playing field.

This is clearly what happened on Sunday night in Super Bowl 2014, when two undrafted players on both sides of the ball performed on a level that might have won them co-MVP honors.  For instance, Chris Matthews, a 6’ 5” wide receiver who looks like a tight end is a compelling candidate.  Most football fans, including this writer, had never heard of Matthews before he recovered that onside kick which put Seattle in a position to win the game against Green Bay, the game that was the gateway to the Super Bowl.

A Star is Born!

USP NFL: SUPER BOWL XLIX-NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS VS S S FBN USA AZ

 A Saving Grace!
NFL: Super Bowl XLIX-New England Patriots vs Seattle Seahawks
Matthews kept the Hawks in the Game

Then Matthews,   who had never caught a pass in the NFL, came into the Super Bowl – the biggest arena in the world – and became a star right before our eyes.  Catching four passes for over a hundred yards and a touchdown, most of them spectacular, Matthews kept the Hawks in the game.   The way he was used in this game offers yet another example of the tremendous skill and football intelligence of quarterback Russell Wilson.

With his go to receivers Doug Baldwin and Jermaine Kearse covered by the great cornerback tandem of Durelle Revis and Browner, Russell turned his attention to Matthews, providing him to opportunity to make some critical plays.  It was in keeping with Russell’s contention that he functions like a point guard in basketball, whose role is to distribute the ball to the players who are in the best position to make great plays.  Wilson threw the ball all over the field and his only interception was on the final play that cost them the game.

The defensive back that picked of the ball, Malcolm Butler, is another miraculous story.  Like Matthews, he was undrafted and unheralded.  I had never heard of him either.  But if you have ever watched the program “Undrafted” on the NFL Network, you will have some idea of the hellish experience such players go through on their rocky road to the NFL. And the performance of these two players demonstrate the excellent athletic gifts some of the also ran’s possess.  However Butler, a safety on the Patriots squad, thought his career was finished after he was burned on that fantastic catch by Jermaine Kearse that put the Hawks in the red zone.  Butler recalls “I just went up and deflected it. Nine times out of 10 it usually goes away from him but as I was looking, I saw him bobble it catch it. Which was devastating.”

Jermaine Kearse’s Magical Catch

Great superbowl catch by Jermaine Kearse

Kearse’s Circus Catch put Seattle in position to win!

Many Patriot fans began to get that doomsday feeling as they remembered the fantastic catch made against them by a receiver with the New York Giants in an earlier Super bowl that they lost.  However fate would soon present Butler with an opportunity for redemption and he made the play that won the game and ascended to instant superstar status whose name is now recognized around the globe!  He tells us how he came to make such a spectacular and consequential play: “I knew what was going to happen “I don’t know how I knew. I just knew. I just beat him to the point and caught the ball.”  And with that the intuitive Malcolm Butler enters into the realm of Super Bowl heroes whose deeds in that game will last as long as football is played.

                                                                  Malcolm   Butler’s critical interception
Butler Malcolm Super Bowl Hero     
The Safety who Saved the Patriots Season

For Russell Wilson the Super Bowl loss must be especially bitter, although he is taking it graciously despite the fact that some are blaming him for the loss.  Alas, nobody is more dedicated to winning than Russell.  Fans are also second guessing the coach and declaring his play calling “the dumbest play in Super Bowl history,” yet a close viewing of the video of the play reveals that it was a clever manuever against a defence that had stacked the box to stop Marshan Lynch, who every football fan in the world expected to get the ball. But the play was foiled by a ngreat dfensive play….which is how the game goes sometimes. Other malevolent trolls, racist and garden variety haters used Russell’s decision to throw the ball as proof that they have been right along: he just doesn’t have the right stuff to be a pro-quarterback.

Astonishingly, the haters repeat this mindless jibberish despite the fact that Russell played splendidly in this game, putting his team up by ten points in the fourth quarter and coming within a footstep from winning his second Super bowl in two years!  Had Russell made the goaline throw he would have secured an honored place in the pantheon of the game’s immortals and been well on the road to the Hall of Fame.  Once again we see that both success and failure are grand imposters that can switch places in the blink of an eye!  Alas, perhaps the Gods were not with Russell on this occasion….or maybe he is the victim of an incompetent coaching decision as multitudes believe.

Nevertheless Wilson has set exceedingly high standards and lofty goals for himself.  For after all is said and done, in the end he remains the winningest quarterback in NFL history over his first three years. And despite his graciousness in the face of defeat, he hates losing.  The fact that this game was in the pocket can only make defeat worse than it otherwise might have been.   But he kept his chin up, predicted victory next year with complete confidence, then exited the stage beaten but unbowed.

*********************

See Malcolm Butler’s Interception
https://vine.co/v/OtEnVFt1eji 
See Chris Matthews Touchdown Catch
http://youtu.be/nc_SrdjqlO0

How Good is Russell Wilson?

Posted in On Sports! with tags , , , on February 1, 2015 by playthell
Russell-Wilson V
Launching the bomb with his Howitzer Arm

 They Call him Dangeruss!

Every time the question is raised regrding Russell Wilson’s standing among  today’s quarterbacks in the National Football League, whose  teams contain the greatest football players on earth, we get ambiguous prattle that damn him with faint praise like the following comment from football Sean Thomlinson of Bleacher Report: “

The human mind falls victim to recency bias far too easily, so foremost in our memories right now are Wilson’s two overtime throws that sealed an improbable comeback. It’s convenient to forget that until the 3:52 mark of the fourth quarter Wilson had eight completions, and he was the reason a series of miraculous events were needed to resuscitate title defense hopes.”

Sean offers this observation in an article titled “Russell Wilson’s Decision-Making Is a Concern Heading into Super Bowl,” where he also tells us “If Wilson’s decision-making and accuracy don’t reverse course swiftly, the Seahawks could have a repeat performance of the NFC Championship Game, just without the ending.” And to unambiguously demonstrate his point he reminds us that “Russell Wilson had a 0.0% accuracy rating under pressure in NFCCG. Just digest that. 0-of-6 with 5 sacks. Still won.” Wow!  Speak of damming with faint praise.  While the facts speak for themselves, what they actually mean depends upon how the observer interprets them; it’s the old bottle half empty or half full conundrum.

As for me, I think Thomlinson is emphasizing the wrong things.  I watched the game and what left the most lasting impression on me is the fact that Brady threw as many interceptions as Wilson when you consider the fact that two of the picks attributed to Wilson were dead on strikes but were dropped by the receivers.  And instead of overemphasizing the fact that Wilson had a bad first half, I am amazed by his poise under pressure; his never say die attitude; his ability to lift the morale of his players and inspire them to believe they can win, even as all the objective facts suggest that to continue to believe is a retreat into fantasy, and the consummate skills and superb judgment to overcome seemingly insurmountable odds and make the plays he needs to make while leading his team to victory!  That’s what left the lasting impression on me in the NFC championship game.

Russell Launches the bomb where only his reciever can get it……
Russell Wilson launching the bomb
………..And Kearse Cradles it for the Win!
Russell puts ball in Kerses arms to win
A Missile from Mr. Magic gets the W!

The more I watch young Russell Wilson the more I am convinced that he is capable of making any play the situation requires in order to win.  In an era of Fantasy Football which is obsessed with personal statistics Russell only cares about the win….which is the only statistic that matters to the entire team.  And, although many fans and commentators alike seem to forget it….winning is why you play the game!  If, as Hall of Fame coach Bill Parcells points out, “you are what the numbers say you are,” Russ has got some very good numbers.

In terms of personal records, based on the length of time he has played in the NFL nobody can boast a better one.  For instance, he tied Peyton Manning’s all-time passing record for a rookie, and he set an all-time record by rushing for over a hundred yards and passing for over three hundred yards in a single game.  His quarterback efficiency record in playoff games was higher than Aaron Roger’s coming into the 2015 NFL Championship game; he is only quarterback in the history of the League to start in two Super Bowls during his first three years, and he is the winningest quarterback ever after playing his first three seasons in the NFL.

Despite this amazing record we still have people saying crazy things like he is “just a game manager,” or “he’s not that good a passer.”  Part of this reflects the desperation of disillusioned white guys who are suffering from an overload of black dominance in football.  Like me they have witnessed professional and major college football become increasingly dominated by black athletes.  However the quarterback position – which is equivalent to a Captain of a ship. Or the commander of a combat brigade in terms of his leadership responsibilities in running the operation – remained a white boy preserve long after the other positions were being masterfully and often spectacularly played by Afro-American athletes.

There was a mythology developed around the quarterback position that only Caucasian males had the right stuff – rapid decision making, accurate passing, poise and calm in the face of charging defensive lineman, etc.  – to effectively play the quarterback position.  Fran Tarkington, the Minnesota Vikings quarterback who lost four Super Bowls announced that he though guys with “blond hair and blue eyes” made the best quarterbacks.  He was of course blue eyed with blond hair.

However Dog Williams, a black man of “deepest dye” – as the 18th century Afro-American scientists Benjamin Banneker described himself to Thomas Jefferson in a letter calling Jefferson out about a racist remark he had made regarding Africans – murdered that myth when he humiliated John Elway in a crushing defeat of the Denver Bronco’s by the Washington Reskins in the Super Bowl.  The fact that the big blond blue eyed Elway looked like a Teutonic super hero, proved no advantage as Williams went on the set nine records in the championship game.

By the time Russell Wilson entered the NFL in 2012 black quarterbacks were no longer exotic figures, the lone exception that proved the rule, and rather than denouncing the athletic mobility that black quarterbacks bring to the game, they were being celebrated as “dual threat” quarterbacks – Randall Cunningham, .“Air” McNair, Donovan McNabb, Michael Vick, Colin Kapernick, RGIII, et al.   Ironically, in the contest between John Elway and Doug Williams it was Elway that was the “duel threat” and Williams was strictly a pocket passer who has said “I don’t believe in the quarterback running the ball.”

Yet, ironically, white quarterbacks have always been celebrated for their ability to “scramble” i.e. run away from the defensive players to avoid a sack should the pocket break down before they have an open receiver to throw to without fear of in interception.  Tarkington was famous for his scrambling ability, as was Elway and Roger Stauback aka “Roger the Dodger.”  In fact Bill Belichek, the great coach of the New England Patriots who will oppose Russell in the Super Bowl, and is tasked with stopping him, recently compared Russell to Staubach who is a first ballot Hall of Famer.

The hood wearing Belichek looks like the Grim Reaper in a bad mood and is notorious as a mumbler, a man of few words, who appears to be in pain each time he utters a word, yet he has been effusive in his praise of Wilson.  After studying Wilson on film Coach Belichek said the Seattle quarterback did everything well and “seemed to have a sixth sense about where the defensive men are” and this is what enable him to make spectacular running or throwing the ball.”  However draft “experts,” like the much celebrated Mel Kiper, denounced Coach Pete Carroll and the Seattle GM for drafting Russell Wilson, who they said was a good college quarterback but had about the same chance of surviving in the pros as a snowball in a pizza oven.

Watching video of Kiper and other wise guy naysayers at the time is an unending source of amusement for me.  Especially in view of the fact that some people saw Russell for the great player that he has always proven to be.  One of those who recognized his special gifts was his coach at the University of Wisconsin, Bret Bielema. Having graduated from North Carolina State University in three years, Russell was drafted by several baseball teams and spent a year on a Major League farm team before realizing that he would rather play professional football.  Since he had a year of college football eligibility left Wilson looked around for a team with a pro-style offense then applied to the University of Wisconsin to play his final year of college football.

Aside from their pass oriented pro-style offense Wilson was attracted by their huge offensive line whose shortest member was 6’ 5” and averaged over 320 pounds.  They would have been the fourth largest line in the NFL; hence Wilson would get a chance to show that he could throw the ball accurately behind the kind of huge offensive lineman he would encounter on the professional level.  And the person who had the best view of his performance that year was his head coach Bret Bielema, who had done such an impressive job at Wisconsin that he was being wooed by the Miami Dolphins for the head coaching job.

In a recent interview Bielema say he told the Dolphin management that he would guarantee them a Super bowl victory within five years if they took his quarterback Russell Wilson in the upcoming NFL draft.  The coach recollects what happened next: “

“They all looked at me like, ‘You can’t say that. That’s the difference between college and pro. He’s undersized. He can’t throw.’  I was like, ‘OK, all right,’ and I honestly, that day, kind of pulled myself out of it.”

Russell Wilson at Wisconsin
Russell wilson at wisconsin
Russell had no problem throwing the ball behind this massive line

Bielema was so certain that Russell Wilson was going to be a star in professional football that he turned the job down because he was convinced that they didn’t have the necessary vision to produce a championship team.  Well, history has proved him right.  The dolphins drafted Ryan Tannehill and have come nowhere the Super Bowl, whereas Russell will be starting in his second Super Bowl in three years!!!  One can only speculate about the fallout from the decision to take Tannehill over Russ, the proto- typical tall stiff white guy with a big arm over the smaller dual threat black guy, but I’d bet my bottom there are some hurt feelings and puzzlement over that decision…..and I would not be surprised to discover some heads have rolled.

While Russell Wilson is not the first, nor the most spectacular duel threat quarterback in terms of size or athletic prowess – see: “Is Colin Kapernick Transracial?” on this blog – he has been the most successful.  Wilson is the only duel threat quarterback yet to win a Super Bowl, and now he is poised to do it again. His record in games against the so called “elite” quarterbacks, most of whom have won at least one Super Bowl, is 10-0!  And he may well win the 2015 Super Bowl, which would make him the only quarterback to win two Super Bowls in his first three seasons in the NFL: Russell Wilson is a baaaad boy!  That’s why they call him “Dangeruss.”

****************

Highlights at the University of Wisconsin 2012
http://youtu.be/B8r7wLnb1xc
Highlighs from Pro Career
http://youtu.be/tdxvM2FySEg
Russell Dancing with Gransma Carroll
http://youtu.be/4SzLD983ovs
The throw that won the NFC Championship
http://youtu.be/MzvsIi7p2-0
Steven A: Damming Russ with faint praise
http://youtu.be/tJMdsoH_1HA

 

Playthell G. Benjamin
Feburary 1, 2014

Dangeruss!

Posted in On Sports! with tags , , , , on February 2, 2014 by playthell

Russell wilson III

Russell Wilson: Magician at Work

 Spinning That Old Black Magic that he Weaves so Well

The reason I’m going against the smart money and picking the Seattle Seahawks to win the Super Bowl is because of Russell Wilson. I find it amusing that among those who give the Seahawks a chance to win they quickly point to the play of running back Marshawn Lynch, or cornerback Dick Sherman.  While no knowledgeable observer can minimize the importance of Lynch running over people in “Beast Mode” or Sherman and “The Legion of Boom,” as hard hitting ball hawking defensive backfield of Seattle is known, it wouldn’t mean a thing without the spectacular play of quarterback Russell Wilson.

In sports you are what the numbers say you are, and the numbers say that Russell Wilson – along with Ben Roethlisberger of Pittsburg – is the winnings quarterback in the history of the game over their first two years in the pros.   And as coach Herman Edwards points out: “you play the game to win!”  Hence I find it beyond annoying to listen to the chatter of those who want to talk about things like total passing yards which, if it does not put you in the championship game and you win it is an irrelevant statistic, a meaningless ornament.

Such numbers would insure a championship if they were engaging in a passing contest where the objective was to test passing skill, but if it does not lead to victory in a football game its much ado about nothing.  This self- evident fact manages to escape many of the sports pundits that dominate the discussion evaluating quarterbacks.  In the case of Peyton Manning, the Quarterback Wilson will be facing in the Super Bowl, the tremendous numbers in the passing game has put him in the Championship game, and we shall see if he wins it.

However Peyton puts up tremendous passing statistics every year, but in over a decade in the league he has gone to the Super Bowl only twice and won it only once.  Russell Wilson, a third round draft choice who was originally intended to be nothing more than a bench warmer to the starter, won the starting job in practice and took the Seahawks to the playoffs for the first time in years during his rookie year.  Now, in only his second season, he has guided his team to the Super Bowl…and there is no question that without spectacular plays from him they would not be there.

Although it was a great play from cornerback Richard Sherman that won the game which put them there, without some great throws from Wilson, made possible by his spellbinding ability to run around outside the pocket and give his receivers an opportunity to make big plays, they would be sitting home watching San francisco in the Super Bowl.  Russell is also very fast and the threat of his keeping the ball and running downfield provides opportunities for the powerful and elusive running back Marshan Lynch to make plays.

They run the “read option” better than anyone in the NFL, and if the defense loads the box to stop Lynch from running up the middle, or going off tackle, Russell will keep the ball and burn them by running outside. And if the defense concentrates on stopping the run, Russell will scorch them with passes down field.  A myth has developed that Seattle cannot put points on the board, but I will remind such critics that this is a team that scored fifty points in back to back games this season.

He’s a Dangerous Passer too!

russell-wilson IV

He makes some great throws…and rarely throws picks

By any objective measure Russell Wilson is special, a little man in a big man’s game; a marvel in a league filled with gifted athletes – a stand out amidst a spectacular collection of driven personalities striving to always perform on the highest level.  The uniqueness of their talent is verified by the millions of dollars they are paid to perform, and the multitudes who spend hours watching them do what they do…ranging from the presidents and kings, wise men and fools, plutocrats and paupers.

The importance of sport as the measure of the character of a society was demonstrated by CLR James, one of the most original political theorist and cultural critics of the twentieth century, in his path breaking book on the British sport of Cricket.  After studying the game as a reflection of the values of the Victorian society in which the game was perfected he remarked “He knows no Cricket Who Only Cricket Knows.”

The same thing can surely be said about American football, for there is no truer reflection of the values cherished by most Americans.  That’s why major college football games often resemble some form of pagan religious ritual and pro football seem like symbolic warfare between city-states.  However since I have already written about this elsewhere I shall simply quote from that earlier essay “On the Cusp of History,” which was written when two black coaches – Tony Dungy and Lovey Smith confronted each other in the Super Bowl for the first and only time.

One cannot fully understand Americans and our society if one does not understand the game of football.   It is no accident that football is the most popular national sport…Football is the perfect metaphor for American civilization.  If Jazz, our nation’s great contribution to fine art, embodies the best American values – love of liberty, exaltation of democracy, and promotion of invention – football symbolizes some of our fundamental vices: the conquest of land through organized aggressiveness, and imposing our will on weaker adversaries by brute force.  The teams are organized like military platoons and their tactics are described in military metaphors, with the quarterbacks routinely referred to as “field generals” and the long pass labeled “the bomb!”  

Thus football is the ideal sport for a civilization born of genocide and slavery, a nation whose national anthem is a war song, and whose symbol as a nation is a vicious bird of prey – the great Bald Eagle!  And it is no accident that the Bald Eagle resides in the West, that theater of some of the bloodiest American aggressions fueled by a hunger for other peoples land.  It is also the incubator of the great American myth of “Manifest Destiny” and the noble mountain man and cowboy, those paragons of American “rugged individualism “- an ideal which is embodied in the football player for many fans. “

Thus one could argue that football is a steam valve that allows Americans to vent their aggressive impulses on the playing fields, which is certainly preferable to violent crime, civil conflict, or war.  And when the game is represented by a mild mannered well-spoken gentleman like Russell Wilson, who embodies the essence of sport – to lose without rancor and win with grace – it can indeed become a cathartic experience for some violence prone personalities in our midst who might otherwise commit aggressive acts if there were no football games to watch.

Both Russell Wilson and Peyton Manning are soft spoken sportsmen who did not come up in the hard way that makes some football players potential felons if not saved by the game.  Hence their play is not fueled by anger or rage.  Peyton Manning grew up the son of a pro-quarterback, Archie Manning of the New Orleans Saints, and lived a life of fame and fortune in one of America’s most beautiful cities.  Russell Wilson grew up in a family that treasured education and intelligence.

His grandfather and grandmother on his father’s side held PhD’s and his father was a Dartmouth grad and college football star who went on to a distinguished law career in Richmond Virginia.  It is from his father, that he learned the game of football and acquired his tenacity, mental toughness, work ethic and eternal optimism.  As a wide receiver good enough to get a tryout with a pro team Russell’s dad knew all the throws a quarterback would have to master in order to play at the highest level, and he was running routes for Russell to throw since he was a little boy.

This is why Russell never gets rattled when the game is on the line; it’s like he has ice water flowing in his veins as he calmly makes great plays where others might lose their poise.  And he does it over and over again!  He is highly intelligent and supremely self-confident without being braggadocios, barely ever raising his voice. But he is an extremely competitive and gifted athlete who was  good enough at baseball to have played the game professionally.  Unlike most players, he loves to come from behind with the clock running out.  With his ability to run, throw, and improvise while thinking on his feet….it is no wonder that Russell Wilson’s nickname is DANGEROUS!

A True Dual Threat

Russell wilson II

Pick Yo Poison!

*********************

Double Click on Link to watch Russell “The Magician”
http://youtu.be/0zPAnyM0yO4
Witness a quarterback that can do it all!!!!
Listen to Wilson discuss quarterback play with coach Gruden
http://youtu.be/0IbYoeSf6Gk
Witness wilson’s high intelligence and supreme confidence
******************
Playthell G. Benjamin
Harlem, New York
Super Sunday 2014

The Pass that Settled a Strike

Posted in On Sports!, Playthell on politics with tags , , , , , , on September 27, 2012 by playthell

                     The Great Dispute

 Revealing sad Truths about American Values

Although people who listen to my commentary may find it hard to believe, I am not necessarily a contrarian.  Even so, I often find myself marching to a different drummer.  Hence I disagree with the howling mob who wants to hang the referee’s whose controversial call gave the Seattle Sea Hawk’s a victory over the Green Bay Packers, in last Monday night’s football game.

The out roar became so loud it was echoed by hard news reporters on nationally televised news shows.   The controversy even found its way into the presidential campaign.  To the casual observer with either a cavalier interest in football, or is indifferent to game, all the hoopla must appear an absurdity. “How can adults get so bent out of shape by a missed call in a kid’s game?” they ask.

Well, as the Trinidadian historian and political philosopher CLR James warned in the opening of his seminal text Beyond a Boundary: “He knows not Cricket who only cricket knows.”  And he shows us how the game of cricket reflected the values of the Victorian upper class.   The same can be said of football, which reflects the values of American civilization.  It is the perfect game for a warlike people whose national anthem is a war song and national symbol a vicious bird of prey.  Football is literally “America’s game.”

The importance of the game in American culture is reflected in the fact that it has been referenced by both President Obama and Mitt Romney on the stump.  And the character of the candidates was exposed in their statements.  President Obama is pro-union and routinely stands with the workers in their demands for fair wages and benefits, which is why they turn out and work for him come election time.  Hence the president’s support for the refs comes as no surprise.

But when Paul Ryan and Mitt Romney called upon the owners to settle the lock out and get the “real refs back on the field,” which meant successfully bargaining with their union over wages and benefits, they were completely out of character. Their hypocrisy was shameless.  Paul Ryan comes from Wisconsin, a state where the governor has curtailed the rights of public sector unions.  And Lyin Ryan has backed his play.

But Wisconsin is also the home of the Green Bay Packers, in fact the team is owned by the citizens of the town, who hold shares in the organization.  So it was an act of opportunism by a man whose allegiance to principle is determined by expedience.  Thus while Ryan is quite prepared to deny bargaining rights to teachers, nurses, fireman, and cops, he insists that the demands of NFL referee’s be met because the home team lost.

He and Mitt could even be heard arguing that the “real refs” should be adequately compensated for their expertise.  Hence by kick off time tonight the “real referees” will be back on the field. The contract they settled will pay the over $200,000 a year and generous benefits including healthcare and a pension, for a part time job a few months a year,  Good for them.  Yet No teacher, nurse or cop anywhere in America is so well compensated.

Republican apologists for this blatant hypocrisy – in which the demands of vital public servants for fair compensation are scoffed at while they demand that the National Football League give the referees what they want – argue that the refs are different from teachers and nurses because they are not being paid from the public till.

Yet everywhere in America hundreds of millions of public dollars are spent in the construction of lavish sports arenas in order to seduce the owners of sports teams into locating in their city.  Hence this kerfuffle over a football game further exposes the duplicity, and twisted values, of the Republican ticket.

They all went for the ball

And started a fight that reverberated around the nation

****************

Playthell G. Benjamin

Harlem, New York

September 27, 2012